Ubuntu

Installing LAMP on Ubuntu 11.04 aka The Natty Narwhal

As new user with Linux using Ubuntu 11.04 I was in the "now what?" moment.
Then I recalled Khalid's presentation on LAMP.
Exploring with the Google I found the following tutorials.

http://tuxtweaks.com/2010/04/installing-lamp-on-ubuntu-10-04-lucid-lynx/
http://tuxtweaks.com/2010/01/how-to-uninstall-lamp-in-ubuntu-9-10-karmic-koala/
http://tuxtweaks.com/2009/07/how-to-configure-apache-linux/

There were tuts going back a few revs but I thought 10.04 tut was close enough to 11.04.
And! Success! I now have a Linux webserver running LAMP.

USB Webcam mistery under Ubuntu Lucid Linx

Maybe someone with better knowledge of USB can shed some light here:

I have an USB camera that I knew was working several Ubuntu versions ago. But under Karmic and Lucid it refused to work.

I knew that it was listed as supported; but after hours trying things I couldn't make it work.

Then I saw in a forum that someone said that as a final test he disconnected the USB hub and plugged in the camera directly to the computer. After that it worked, so he suspected the hub.

Ubuntu Lucid Lynx printer troubleshooting wizard was quite helpful

In my previous post I explained how to install the Lexmark printer drivers in Ubuntu/Mint.

What I left out was how was I able to very easily identify what was the problem when all was finally installed and things weren't working.

It really came down to the Printer troubleshooting wizard included in Ubuntu/Mint.

Installing a Lexmark x1155 using the z600 driver

Summary:
I've created a small script that does most of the work for me. I've used it successfully on varios versions of Fedora, Ubuntu, Mint and Puppy Linux, so I am certain that it should work in most distributions.

Here are the step by step instructions:

  1. Ensure that the following commands are installed, if not, install them using your distribution regular mechanism: rpm2cpio, cpio, ldconfig. e.g. sudo aptitude install rpm2cpio

Why and How I removed unecessary steps to loggin in to Mint/Ubuntu

Disclaimer: The actions described here are suitable for a Home desktop. I would not do the same to a laptop or public desktop.

I'm trying to convince my sons to use Linux instead of booting in Windows. They really dislike having to enter the userid and password then enter the keyring password. For now, they don't care about having their "own" desktop or custom configurations.

After the installation Ubuntu asks for my wireless network parameters and it saves the WPA key

In subsequent log ins the default behaviour of Ubuntu is the following:

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