remote collaboration

Installing WebHuddle

This will be the shortest post from this series.

To install WebHuddle I followed the instructions from the WebHuddle User Guide

There you will find all the steps in detail and a wealth of extra information regarding the WebHuddle configuration.

I did my installation on a minimal Debian install and the instructions worked for me.

Installing OpenMeetings on Debian Lenny

On the previous post I showed you what you could do with OpenMeetings. Now it's time to describe how to install it on your own server.

Although you can install it in any version of Linux provided you have access to the proper dependencies, I decided to do the set up on a minimal installation of Debian 5.03 "Lenny", that way I could ensure I identified all the components needed. This will also ensure that if you want to install it in a different Distribution, you have all the elements to do it.

Web conferencing

All the tools and methods described on the previous posts work very well with a small number of people sharing a desktop or collaborating, given that access must be granted and computer addresses shared, they work well within a trusted group.

For situations where you need to collaborate with "untrusted" people or with a large number of people, the best option is to use web conferencing software.

NX

On my post about XDMCP I mentioned that there was a better way to open a X session on a remote computer.

After reading this post you'll see why I left it at the end of this blog therad: NX uses elements and concepts explained on the previous posts (SSH, X forwarding, XDMCP, VNC)

VNC (Virtual Network Computing )

Up to now the graphical solutions I've shown were focused on accessing the X desktop. I've also focused on accessing a session exclusively.

On this post I will talk about a tool that is OS independent. You can share a Mac or Windows or Linux desktop and that allows remote collaboration with multiple people looking and controlling the same desktop.

VNC uses the RFB protocol to transmit keyboard and mouse signals to remote computer and receive back the graphical screen.

Introduction to remote collaboration tutorials

Phew! It's been a week since the KWLUG meeting where I talked about remote collaboration.

Believe or not, I hadn't had a moment, until now, to make good on my promise to post the tutorials on-line.

First I was on Project Management training in Toronto from Monday to Wednesday, then, Thursday and Friday preparing for an implementation at work that kept me at home in front of the computer all Saturday and Sunday.

Remote Collaboration: A successful presentation

It seems that the time was well spent preparing this presentation. I had an awesome and engaged audience that kept with me through out the presentation, even while we were trying to sort the technical limitations of the physical space.

Unfortunately it seems that the webcast wasn't as successful due to the limited bandwidth at the meeting location. Next time I'll use plan B.

If you logged in remotely, please let me know how was your experience. was the sound good? was the screen choppy? What would you like to see for next time?

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