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I have a lead on a short term contract for a customized Fedora serial driver

I have a lead on a short term piece of work on a customization of a serial
kernel module to meet the specs below.

Contact me offlist if you think this is something you know how to do.

bob
ican@netrover.com

=========== snip from client description of problem ==========
> I have a C program in Linux that talks to slot machine which require a
> wakeup bit be set. The protocol requiers 1 start, 8 data, 1 wakeup, 1
> stop bit.
>
> Essentially I need the set or 127 characters to go out with the parity
> bit set to zero. In addition I need, at least, to be able to send out
> 0x00, 0x01, 0x80, 0x81 and 0x82 out with the parity bit set to 1.

How can we help?

Here's an interesting rumour for us to consider. First seen on the Yahoo! Financial SCOX forum.

[Microsoft(r) tech support] told me that "in the fall, having the latest WGA will become mandatory and if its not installed, Windows will give a 30 day warning and when the 30 days is up and WGA isn't installed, Windows will stop working, so you might as well install WGA now." -- Ed Bott's Blog

This could be a complete fabrication, a case of broken telephone, FUD, a trial balloon from Redmond or something else. But what if it is close to being true? Any way to confirm or refute this? Anybody know anybody at Microsoft(r) with the ability, the clout and the willingness to get a real answer on this? A written answer, with attribution? Of course, with enough public outcry, Microsoft(r) will simply change their mind on this (if it's a trial balloon) and claim that the speakers were "wrong, misinformed, spoke out of turn," and deny all complicity.

Would you like a Super Computer with that?

Found on the Globe and Mail web site.

The students who use the computer lab at St. Francis Xavier University in Antigonish, N.S., probably aren't aware that at night the lab transforms into the equivalent of a supercomputer.

All day long, St. Francis Xavier University students sit at the lab's rows of PCs to surf the Internet, write papers, arrange dates or listen to podcasts. During the day, the machines run Microsoft's Windows operating system. But at night that all changes. At 11 p.m, the students are gone, the doors are locked and the lights are out. It's time to close Windows until morning.

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